OSC

Since 1987, OSC has been providing our clients services in four areas, or functions:

Supercomputing. OSC provides the computational power and storage that scientists need to meet their research goals.  Whether researchers need to harness the incredible power of a parallel processor cluster to better understand deep space, a vector processor machine to do weather modeling, or a mid-size shared memory processor system to model the human heart, OSC has the hardware and software solutions to meet their needs.

Research. A staff of high performance computing and networking research experts maintain active research programs in HPC and Networking, Homeland Security and Defense, Environmental Sciences, Engineering and Life Sciences. Our goals are to lead science and engineering research efforts, assist researchers with custom needs and collaborate with regional, national and international researchers in groundbreaking initiatives.

Education. OSC has a national reputation for its training and education programs. Staff teach faculty and student researchers through scientific computing workshops, one-on-one classes, and web-based portal training. Ohio students gain exposure to the world of high performance computing and networking during our annual summer institutes for young women in middle school and for junior and senior high school students. And, the statewide, virtual Ralph Regula School of Computational Science coordinates computational science and engineering education activities for all levels of learning.

Cyberinfrastructure. The Ohio Supercomputer Center’s cyberinfrastructure and software development researchers provide the user community with various high performance computing software options. This variety enables researchers to select parallel computing languages they most prefer, and just as important, it creates a test bed for exploring these systems. By taking a holistic approach to generating efficient supercomputing applications for researchers, the Center’s cyberinfrastructure and software development research capitalizes on all the components within the cycle of innovation — development, experimentation, and analysis - and continuously improves the services provided.

U.S. Representative announces metrology defense center of excellence funding for OSC, YSU, and partners

Youngstown, Ohio – February 20, 2009 – U.S. Rep. Tim Ryan announced today a $1.6 million federal direct appropriation to establish a National Defense Center of Excellence in Industrial Metrology and 3D Imaging headquartered at Youngstown State University.

The center, funded by the U.S. Department of Defense Army Research Lab, will focus on developing and improving advanced manufacturing technologies for military and commercial uses that could have widespread economic impact across the Northeast Ohio region and throughout the United States.

Defense Department Renews Technology Transfer Contract With Ohio Supercomputer Center

COLUMBUS, Ohio -- May 19, 2004 -- The U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) announced that the Ohio Supercomputer Center (OSC) would receive $650,000 to provide technical leadership and program management to Mississippi State University (MSU) as it develops and improves high performance computing systems for the military. OSC will also receive $1.35 million to provide technical support in Signal Image Processing and Integrated Modeling and Test Environments.

Ohio Supercomputer Center Offers MPI Workshop at Miami University

If you have research projects requiring large amounts of memory and/or CPU power, this upcoming workshop at Miami University, Oxford, Ohio, is for you.

Held on May 17 and 18 from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., the “Parallel Programming with MPI” workshop will teach you how to leverage multiple processors to advance your science. This course, sponsored by Miami University and the Ohio Supercomputer Center (OSC), is geared toward those with C or Fortran programming language experience. It will be held in the University’s Gaskill Hall, room 201.

Future surgeons practice delicate techniques with new computer simulation teaching tool

Surgeon using vtbone simulatorNational award for special contributions to medical education recognizes Ohio Supercomputer Center, Nationwide Children’s, Ohio State innovation

Columbus, Ohio - July 28, 2008 - The next generation of surgeons – many who grew up playing video games – are using real-time, interactive computer simulations to learn the difficult and delicate surgical techniques associated with the temporal bone in the human skull.

K-State professor shares research to develop better Internet search tools that identify emerging trends

Columbus, Ohio (April 17, 2009) Next-generation Internet search techniques will greatly improve the ability to sift through the massive, ever-changing information posted to the Web – and enable people to better use this information for identifying critical issues such as homeland security concerns or imminent disease outbreaks, said William H. Hsu, PhD, an associate professor of computer and information sciences and director of the Laboratory for Knowledge Discovery in Databases at Kansas State University.

Student's Work With Epidural Simulator Lands Her a Place in National Conference

Columbus, Ohio -- September 15, 1997 -- When Leslie Hiemenz's doctoral adviser encouraged her to take her engineering skills and use them to advance medicine, she never imagined she would end up presenting her work at a national conference.

"I can't believe that I have come this far," said Leslie Hiemenz, a Ph.D. student in biomedical engineering at The Ohio State University. "It feels awesome. I keep giggling every time I read the conference poster and see that the presenters are 'experts in their fields.'"

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