Research

Recent survey identifies gaps in educational resources needed to train America's future computational scientists

Report cites need for materials to take advantage of petascale computing

Columbus, Ohio (July 1, 2009) – A recent survey of American researchers, software developers, educators and students reveals that a significant national effort is needed to fill gaps in education and training materials needed to prepare tomorrow’s computational scientists to take advantage of high performance supercomputers.

Ohio Supercomputer Center, Ralph Regula School to power Choose Ohio First bioinformatics program

DNA imageConsortium garners $4.475 million in state funding, aims to put Ohio in Top 5

Columbus, Ohio – March 18, 2008 – A proposal led by Ohio University and powered by the resources of the Ohio Supercomputer Center and the Ralph Regula School of Computational Science is aimed at positioning the state as a national leader in the emerging field of bioinformatics.

Blue Collar Computing Receives HPCwire 2006 Readers' Choice Award

November 14, 2006 -- The Blue Collar Computing program at the Ohio Supercomputer Center (OSC) today received the prestigious HPCwire 2006 Readers’ Choice Award for “Best Collaboration Between Government and Industry.” HPCwire is considered the leading source for global news and information covering the ecosystem of high productivity computing.

Dinosaur Takes Center Stage at Ohio Supercomputer Center

COLUMBUS, Ohio -- Dec. 1, 2005 -- The Ohio Supercomputer Center (OSC) will take a journey 66 million years back in time today, to showcase Jane, a Tyrannosaurus Rex exhibit at the Burpee Museum of Natural History in Rockford, IL. D ozens of presenters, hundreds of participants, and thousands of viewers in 40 countries on six continents around the world will be along for the ride.

Ohio Supercomputer Center empowers development of new solar energy material

By Pam Frost Gorder

COLUMBUS, Ohio -- October 22, 2008 -- Researchers have created a new material that overcomes two of the major obstacles to solar power: it absorbs all the energy contained in sunlight, and generates electrons in a way that makes them easier to capture.

Ohio State University chemists and their colleagues combined electrically conductive plastic with metals including molybdenum and titanium to create the hybrid material. This new material is the first that can absorb all the energy contained in visible light at once.

Pages

Subscribe to Research