Glenn

PAUP

PAUP is a leading program for performing phylogenetic analysis for bioinformatics sequences. PAUP currently runs as a single processor program. No further enhancements are suggested.

MrBayes

MrBayes is a program for the Bayesian estimation of phylogeny. Bayesian inference of phylogeny is based upon a quantity called the posterior probability distribution of trees, which is the probability of a tree conditioned on the observations. The conditioning is accomplished using Bayes's theorem. The posterior probability distribution of trees is impossible to calculate analytically; instead, MrBayes uses a simulation technique called Markov chain Monte Carlo (or MCMC) to approximate the posterior probabilities of trees.

LS-DYNA

LS-DYNA is a general purpose finite element code for simulating complex structural problems, specializing in nonlinear, transient dynamic problems using explicit integration. LS-DYNA is one of the codes developed at Livermore Software Technology Corporation (LSTC).

Jmol

Jmol is a simple molecular visualization program. It can read many file formats and can write various formats. Animations of normal modes and simulations are implemented. Jmol is an OpenScience Java application.

Intel Compilers

The Intel compilers for both C/C++ and FORTRAN.

Availability and Restrictions

Intel Compiler is available on Glenn, Oakley and Ruby Clusters. The versions currently available at OSC are:

HMMER

Profile hidden Markov models (profile HMMs) can be used to do sensitive database searching using statistical descriptions of a sequence family's consensus. HMMER uses profile HMMs, and can be useful in situations like:

  • if you are working with an evolutionarily diverse protein family, a BLAST search with any individual sequence may not find the rest of the sequences in the family.
  • the top hits in a BLAST search are hypothetical sequences from genome projects.
  • your protein consists of several domains which are of different types.

HMMER (pronounced 'hammer', as in a more precise mining tool than BLAST) was developed by Sean Eddy at Washington University in St. Louis.

HMMER is a very cpu-intensive program and is parallelized using threads, so that each instance of hmmsearch or the other search programs can use all the cpus available on a node. HMMER on OSC clusters are intended for those who need to run HMMER searches on large numbers of query sequences.

Gaussian

Gaussian is the most popular general purpose electronic structure program. Its latest version, g09, can perform density functional theory, Hartree-Fock, Möller-Plesset, coupled-cluster, and configuration interaction calculations among others. Geometry optimizations, vibrational frequencies, magnetic properties, and solution modeling are available. It performs well as black-box software on closed-shell ground state systems.

Glenn

Photo: Image of the Glenn supercomputer

The Ohio Supercomputer Center's IBM Cluster 1350, named "Glenn", features AMD Opteron multi-core technologies. The system offers a peak performance of more than 54 trillion floating point operations per second and a variety of memory and processor configurations. The current Glenn Phase II components were installed and deployed in 2009, while the earlier phase of Glenn – now decommissioned – had been installed and deployed in 2007.

EMBOSS

EMBOSS is "The European Molecular Biology Open Software Suite". EMBOSS is a free Open Source software analysis package specially developed for the needs of the molecular biology (e.g. EMBnet) user community. The software automatically copes with data in a variety of formats and even allows transparent retrieval of sequence data from the web. Also, as extensive libraries are provided with the package, it is a platform to allow other scientists to develop and release software in true open source spirit. EMBOSS also integrates a range of currently available packages and tools for sequence analysis into a seamless whole.

Within EMBOSS you will find around hundreds of programs (applications) covering areas such as:

  • Sequence alignment,
  • Rapid database searching with sequence patterns,
  • Protein motif identification, including domain analysis,
  • Nucleotide sequence pattern analysis---for example to identify CpG islands or repeats,
  • Codon usage analysis for small genomes,
  • Rapid identification of sequence patterns in large scale sequence sets,
  • Presentation tools for publication

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