Ruby

Parallel netCDF

PnetCDF is a library providing high-performance parallel I/O while still maintaining file-format compatibility with  Unidata's NetCDF, specifically the formats of CDF-1 and CDF-2. Although NetCDF supports parallel I/O starting from version 4, the files must be in HDF5 format. PnetCDF is currently the only choice for carrying out parallel I/O on files that are in classic formats (CDF-1 and 2). In addition, PnetCDF supports the CDF-5 file format, an extension of CDF-2, that supports more data types and allows users to define large dimensions, attributes, and variables (>2B elements).

Queues and Reservations

These are in flux, as we are developing policies during the Early User period.

Here are the queues available on Ruby. Please note that you will be routed to the appropriate queue based on your walltime and job size request.

Name Nodes available max walltime max job size notes

Serial

Executing Programs

Batch Requests

Batch requests are handled by the TORQUE resource manager and Moab Scheduler as on the Oakley and Glenn systems. Use the qsub command to submit a batch request, qstat to view the status of your requests, and qdel to delete unwanted requests. For more information, see the manual pages for each command.

There are some changes for Ruby, they are listed here:

Boost

Boost is a set of C++ libraries that provide helpful data structures and numerous support functions in a wide range of aspects of programming, such as, image processing, gpu programming, concurrent programming, along with many algorithms.  Boost is portable and performs well on a wide variety of platforms.

Ruby Phi FAQ

The Ruby cluster is composed of both standard Intel Xeon CPUs as well as new Xeon Phi coprocessors.  Special considerations must be taken both when compiling for and running software on the Phi coprocessors.  This guide provides general information on the Phi coprocessors and breaks down the different types of programming models available for them.  For detailed information on compiling software for our Phis, please refer to our Phi Compiling Guide

Phi Compiling Guide

This document was created to guide users through the compiling and execution of programs for Ruby's Phi coprocessors.  It is not intended to help determine which of the Phi usage models to use.  No special actions are needed for programs running exclusively on the host  For more general information on Ruby and its Phi coprocessors see our Ruby FAQ page.  Only Fortran, C, and C++ code can be compiled to run on the Phi coprocessors.  Code to be run on Ruby or the Xeon Phi coprocessors should be compiled on Ruby.

Ruby

Ruby is currently unavailable for general access.
TIP: Remember to check the menu to the right of the page for related pages with more information about Ruby's specifics.

Ruby, named after the Ohio native actress Ruby Dee, is The Ohio Supercomputer Center's newest cluster.  An HP built, Intel® Xeon® processor-based supercomputer, Ruby provides almost the same amount of total computing power (~144 TF) as our former flagship system Oakley on less than half the number of nodes (240 nodes).  Ruby also features two distinct sets of hardware accelerators; 20 nodes are outfitted with NVIDIA® Tesla K40 and another 20 nodes feature Intel® Xeon® Phi co-processors.

NB: Ruby is currently a very dynamic environment, and changes are happening frequently as we continue development. Information in this documentation may be outdated.

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