Energy/Chemical

While at DuPont Chemical Company, Charles Kettering, from Loudonville, was responsible for Freon, used in refrigeration and air conditioning systems. Roy J. Plunkett, from New Carlisle, discovered Teflon in 1938. Today, along with DuPont, many companies along the energy supply chain have made their homes in the Buckeye State.

Solar Fuel

Consumption of energy is increasing worldwide due to the steady increase in the human population and the long-term growth of the international economy. A group of researchers at a northwestern Ohio science lab have been leveraging Ohio Supercomputer Center services to investigate solar-based fuel production as a sustainable alternative to fossil fuels.

Industrial Explosives

Alfred Nobel, namesake of the Nobel Prizes, was originally known for inventing dynamite, though not fondly, as he found out. When his brother died, a newspaper erroneously reported Alfred’s death. The obituary chided him for his invention that, especially at that time, often proved deadly.

Energy Generation

The performance of semiconductor devices such as solar cells, detectors, etc., depends strongly on the properties of materials used in their fabrication. Deep understanding of these properties and the ability to tune them is critical for the development of new generations of advanced photovoltaics and electronics.

2015-16 OSC Overview

In 2016, the Ohio Supercomputer Center arrived at another crossroads. We began installation of the most powerful supercomputer in the history of the center. We swapped out almost all of our storage and other infrastructure, essentially rebuilding OSC’s production infrastructure from the ground up.

Racing Behavior

Drive a car not originally built for racing around an oval track at about 200 miles per hour for a couple of hours and you should begin to understand why stock car drivers would want the latest and greatest information on things, such as how their car will handle in close traffic on a banked curve.

Dark Matter

To begin understanding dark matter in astrophysics, one must first step into a world where galaxies are considered small. The is the world that Annika Peter, Ph.D., and graduate student Stacy Kim are discovering more fully at The Ohio State University’s Center for Cosmology and AstroParticle Physics.

Reactor Prototypes

Compared to its centuries-old fossil fuel counterparts, nuclear power is a young player in today’s lineup of energy sources. Still, since the world’s first nuclear power plant became operational in 1954, there have been three marked advancement periods, or generations, of nuclear technology. Each new generation has improved upon the current safety and performance of the previous generation.

Carbon Injection

The Department of Energy supports pilot projects and basic research that evaluate the feasibility of capturing carbon dioxide created by industrial processes and power plants and injecting it into deep geologic formations for permanent storage, known as geo-sequestration.  This is part of evaluating strategies for reducing atmospheric emissions and mitigating accumulation of greenhouse gasses. 

The Kondo Effect

Several years ago, a Physics World article posed the question, “Why would anyone still want to study a physical phenomenon that was discovered in the 1930s, explained in the 1960s and has been the subject of numerous reviews since the 1970s?”

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