Industrial Engagement

Industrial Engagement icon

The Ohio Supercomputer Center has a long history of supporting industrial research, reaching back as far as the Center’s founding in 1987. Manufacturers have leveraged the Center’s computational and storage resources to design and test many products, such as electronics, fans, containers, fuel cells and wind deflectors.

Improving Industry Collaborations

Screen shot of a TotalSim simulation application.

A research team recently sought to transform how professionals and students make and learn about advanced manufacturing components through a “simulation-as-a-service” app based on cloud resources and software access. Their application allows users to remotely access software and compute resources using a virtual desktop-as-a-service system for advanced manufacturing processes. 

Dissipating Thermal Energy

Model of thermal energy transfer from full, printed circuit boards

Demand for electronic devices of increasingly smaller sizes and with substantially improved processor and graphics functionality has resulted in higher-density power requirements. Consequently, significant increases in heat generated are being registered at the component, board and system levels.

Optimizing Plastic Containers

Plastic container simulation

KLW Plastics, a leading designer, manufacturer and distributor of containers, recently partnered with Kinetic Vision and the Ohio Supercomputer Center to evaluate the effectiveness of advanced modeling and simulation technologies to optimize its container products by lightening their weight, while maintaining the required strength.

Enhancing Pavement Engineering

Simulation of cracking concrete slabs

Most American highways are constructed as a Portland cement concrete (PCC) slabs that are poured and finished on a layered roadbed. Such pavement structures are subjected to millions of applications of traffic wheel-loads, as well as numerous cycles of temperature and moisture variations, and eventually succumb to cracking. 

Elastomeric Space Seals

A University of Akron researcher is designing computer prediction models to test potential new docking seals that will better preserve breathable cabin air for astronauts living aboard the International Space Station and other NASA spacecraft.

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