Research Landscape

Research Landscape icon

Ohio’s strengths in basic and applied research are broad and deep, spanning a multitude of fields, such as economics, sociology, computer science, automotive design and signal processing. This spectrum of Ohio Supercomputer Center clients encompasses many fields of study.

Electrical Double Layers

Many biological molecules and common surfaces carry an electrical charge. For example, DNA has a strong negative charge, and so does an amorphous form of silicon dioxide known as silica, the material most people recognize as “glass.” A charged molecule or surface, along with the electrically compensating layer of ions in the adjacent solution, is known as the electrical double layer (EDL).

Elastomeric Space Seals

A University of Akron researcher is designing computer prediction models to test potential new docking seals that will better preserve breathable cabin air for astronauts living aboard the International Space Station and other NASA spacecraft.

Multi-scale Loading

A Cleveland Clinic research team is developing virtual models of human knee joints to better understand how tissues and their individual cells react to heavy loads – virtual models that someday can be used tounderstand damage caused by the aging process or by debilitating diseases, such as osteoarthritis.

Low-light Detection

Human sight depends on an organized choreography of the retina with its cone and rods cells, the optic nerve, the brain’s visual cortex and light – be it a sunny day or a dark, star-studded night.

Remarkably, in extremely poor illumination conditions, the retina can still perceive intensities corresponding to only a few photons. Rod rhodopsins enable this high sensitivity.

DNA sequence Analysis

At The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center – Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital and Richard J. Solove Research Institute (OSUCCC), cancer researchers turn to the multifunctional Nucleic Acid Shared Resource (NASR) Illumina Core to analyze genomic and epigenomic influences on the disease – and indirectly, the Ohio Supercomputer Center.

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