Supercomputing

OSC Acquires 200 Seats of Linux Fortran, C and C++ Compilers and Tools from the Portland Group (PGI)

 

 The Portland Group, Inc. (PGI) and OSC (Ohio Supercomputer Center) today announced that OSC has acquired 200 copies of PGI Workstation, PGI's suite of parallel Fortran, C and C++ compilers and tools for Linux workstations. The announcement was made from SC99, the world's largest conference for high performance computing sponsored by ACM SIGARCH and the IEEE Computer Society.

Ohio Supercomputer Center Adds IBM SP2 to Technology Infrastructure

Nadine Taylor, Andy Russell
IBM POWER Parallel Division
(914) 766-2458/9230

The Ohio Supercomputer Center (OSC) announces that it has installed a powerful new computer -- an IBM RISC System/6000* Scalable POWERparallel Systems * SP2. As a valuable supercomputing resource for universities and businesses across Ohio, OSC's goal is to provide its users with the best computing technology available. The IBM parallel computer joins an already impressive array of high-performance parallel and vector/parallel computing platforms available at the Center.

Distributed Memory MIMD Programming and Operating Environment for Heterogeneous UNIX Computers on a Network

Software development specialists at the Ohio Supercomputer Center have released Local Area Multiprocessor (LAM) to the parallel processing and cluster computing community. LAM has been ported to several leading UNIX machines such as Sun, SGI, RS/6000, DEC APX and to Cray running UNICOS. LAM is freely available under a GNU license via anonymous ftp from tbag.osc.edu or from gopher at gopher.osc.edu. URL is gopher: //gopher.osc.edu:70/Software/Trollius.

Ohio Supercomputer Center serves new research groups with launch of "Csuri" Advanced GPU Environment

A new, advanced service offered by the Ohio Supercomputer Center leverages the unique computing properties of the Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) to provide a robust visualization environment to researchers in fields as diverse as biomedicine, electrosciences and the animation arts.

Virtual Surgery

In an effort to create better trained surgeons, teaching professor Dr. Gregory Wiet and the Ohio Supercomputer Center have been working on a project known as the Validation Dissemination of Temporal Bone Dissection that looks at simulating surgery through computer visualization, applied force, and even changes in sound. Future surgeons are using this technology that allows for direct consequences to action and gives them opportunities to experience problems that may occur in a real surgery that they must react to quickly.

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