Research

Disaster relief

Off the top of your head, how many languages can you name? Ten? Twenty? More?

It is estimated there are more than 7,000 languages worldwide. For those involved in disaster relief efforts, the breadth and variety of that number can be overwhelming, especially when addressing areas with low resources.

SUG conference brings faculty and students together with OSC staff

In a week marked by a 30-year milestone, researchers who are breaking new ground came face to face Thursday with the computational experts helping them explore uncharted territory.

A day after the Ohio Supercomputer Center celebrated its 30th anniversary jointly with the Ohio Academic Recources Network (OARnet), the Center held its Statewide Users Group (SUG) Autumn Conference. SUG is a volunteer group composed of the scientists and engineers who provide OSC’s leadership with program and policy advice and direction to ensure a productive environment for research.

SUG meeting illustrates wealth of OSC-supported research

SUG

More than ever, academic and manufacturing researchers from across Ohio are turning to the high performance computing power offered by the Ohio Supercomputer Center (OSC). On Thursday, an abundance of that research was on display at OSC’s semi-annual Statewide Users Group (SUG) meeting.

Attendees shared and gained insight into topics ranging from auto safety and dark matter to gene flow and a myriad of chemistry-related topics. They also heard two keynote addresses, and the competition portion of the meeting featured 27 posters and 12 flash talks.

 

OSC part of NSF-funded consortium for advancing research computing practices

CLEMSON, S.C. (Sept. 30, 2016) – The National Science Foundation has awarded a consortium of 28 collaborating institutions, including the Ohio Supercomputer Center (OSC) and led by Clemson University, a $750,000 grant to fund a Research Coordination Network to set up a national forum for the exchange and dissemination of best practices, expertise and technologies to enable the advancement of campus-based research computing activities. 

Disease forecasting: New methodology will allow proactive approach to epidemic containment

DJ Rao
Rao has developed an award-winning disease forecasting model. (Photo credit: Miami University/Jeff Sabo)

When life-threatening weather events loom, forecasters warn citizens days, even weeks, beforehand so they can take action. It seems to work: We clear supermarket shelves, board up windows and even evacuate to higher ground ahead of the impending tempest to avoid danger.

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