Biological Sciences

Biological Sciences icon

Ohio’s bioscience researchers are leveraging the resources of the Ohio Supercomputer Center to gather and analyze massive amounts of genetic, molecular and environmental data to better understand human physiology, individualize diagnoses and treat diseases.

Evaluating Silica Nanochannels

The amorphous silica nanochannel (red and yellow) confining a stream (red and white) of electrolyte-water solution

Microdevices, such as Labs-On-a-Chip (LOC) systems, are used for biomolecular detection and custom chemical synthesis, among other applications. Over the last decade, LOC systems have evolved from a single channel to systems capable of integrating thousands of reaction vessels, conduits and valves. 

Combating Nerve Agents

computational chemistry image

At the Ohio State Center for Catalytic Bioscavenger Medical Defense Research II, chemists Thomas J. Magliery and Christopher M. Hadad lead a team that employs sophisticated methods of protein engineering, high-throughput screening and computational chemistry.

Multi-scale Loading

A Cleveland Clinic research team is developing virtual models of human knee joints to better understand how tissues and their individual cells react to heavy loads – virtual models that someday can be used tounderstand damage caused by the aging process or by debilitating diseases, such as osteoarthritis.

Low-light Detection

Human sight depends on an organized choreography of the retina with its cone and rods cells, the optic nerve, the brain’s visual cortex and light – be it a sunny day or a dark, star-studded night.

Remarkably, in extremely poor illumination conditions, the retina can still perceive intensities corresponding to only a few photons. Rod rhodopsins enable this high sensitivity.

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